Announcing Be More Pirate’s Alex Barker as our conference keynote speaker

AVM is pleased to announce Alex Barker, Right Hand Pirate to Pirate Captain Sam Conniff Allende, author of the book ‘Be More Pirate‘, as our keynote speaker for this year’s conference! 

Alex will be launching our conference with an interactive session, to get us thinking about how we, as leaders of volunteering, can take on the world – or at the very least, our organisations – and win! Alex will also be staying the whole day, as she will be joining the panel for the afternoon surgery session, so get thinking about what you want to ask Alex on the day. 

We will also have Karl Wilding, early into his tenure as the new Chief Executive of NCVO, in conversation with AVM Chair, Ruth Leonard, in the afternoon. Ruth will be asking Karl about his thoughts on volunteering, volunteer management and the place of civil society within the changing world.

To join Alex, all our brilliant speakers, and over 200 of your peers, book your ticket to THE premier event for volunteer managers, leaders and heads of volunteering today.

If you can’t wait to hear from Alex, join us 19 September, from 7:30pm, for our Twitter bookclub #LoVolsBookClub, where we’ll be discussing ‘Be More Pirate’.

AVM Conference 2019 tickets are live

We might be biased, but the AVM conference is always a – if not THE – highlight of our year. So we’re really pleased to let you know that you can get your early-bird tickets for #AVM2019 now!

We’re really excited to tell you that this year we will have a conversation with Karl Wilding, the new Chief Executive of NCVO. AVM Chair, Ruth Leonard will be asking Karl about his thoughts on volunteering, volunteer management and the place of civil society within the changing world. Karl will start his new role mid-September, and we’re so pleased that he has committed to speaking at our annual conference so soon into his new role.

Our members tell us that AVM conference is the premier event for volunteer managers, leaders and heads of volunteering. Each year conference creates the kind of buzz that will only get with 250 people who are passionate and proactive about volunteer management in the same place.

Each year we select a varied range of speakers, who are at the forefront of volunteer management and thought leadership, to offer you a mix of inspiring keynote speakers, workshops on a variety of themes, and, for the second year running, the Volunteer Managers’ Advice Surgery.

Not to mention, there will be loads of opportunities for you to network and chat to other leaders of volunteering from across a variety of sectors and organisations, and make new connections throughout the day.

Early-bird prices are available for the first 50 members booking, so don’t delay, book your ticket today!

You can see the full agenda, venue details, and book your ticket to #AVM2019 on our website.

Presentations from the AVM Conference 2018

Futurology: The UK trends that may impact Volunteering by 2030

Tiger de Souza, Director (Volunteering, Participation & Inclusion), National Trust

Getting past Groundhog Day: Why our leadership needs to change the conversations we’re having about volunteering

Helen Timbrell, People and Organisational Development Consultant

Putting Volunteering at Our Heart: England Athletics Strategy

Chris Jones, CEO, England Athletics

Organisational Values and Volunteering

Anne-Marie Zaritsky, Head of Volunteering, Mencap & Sara Sheard, Deputy People Director, Mencap

Organisational values and volunteers – to be lived, not laminated

Mencap has gone through an organisational wide cultural change in the last few years, including the development of a new set of values. We will share how we have translated these values and new ways of working to both employees and volunteers, discussing our success and challenges along the way, and the impact this has had.

We will share some of the tools we’ve developed, and how values can play a key part in the volunteer journey, from recruitment through to recoginition.

Particpants will then have the opportunity to reflect on their own organisational values; are they relevant to volunteers? Do your volunteers know what they are and why you have them? How do values translate into behaviours? How can working towards a shared set of values impact on culture and strategy? What is the role of the volunteer manager in this?

So you think you want a volunteer management system?

Wendy Halley, (previously Programme Manager – Volunteering Systems & Processes, Save the Children)

What you need to know if you’re thinking of getting a new volunteer database. A non-tech overview of what to consider and prepare before taking your first step.

Spreadsheets and Access databases just don’t cut it anymore. The volunteers of tomorrow, and many of today’s too, want to interact online. The benefits of a good volunteer management system are mind-blowing. How’s seven minutes to get back a reference without doing any work at all?! But there’s a lot more to it than just buying a system. In this workshop we’ll look at the steps you’ll need to go through, the questions you need to ask and the ones you’ll need to answer.

From the initial idea, to the business case and making the arguments internally (often the biggest hurdle), we’ll consider the less obvious issues that you could come up against throughout the entire process from proposal to implementation.

We’ll not be looking at all the solutions on the market but you’ll get information and guidance, from the experience of two implementations, to be more prepared if you choose to go down this exciting route.

Building confidence for volunteers with support needs

Fleur Donnelly-Jackson, Volunteers Manager, and Walney Virgilio, Volunteers Coordinator, Tate Britain & Tate Modern

Develop an understanding of the Social Model of Disability and learn from Tate’s experiences of supporting volunteers with learning difficulties, to become more confident in their volunteering and interacting with the public. Explore how you can make your volunteer opportunities accessible and inclusive, develop a support offer, and make appropriate adaptions. This will be an opportunity to hear about and share good practice/ experiences, and learn about how your organisation could improve opportunities for volunteers with learning disabilities. We will also try out some theatre games, drawn from the theories of Augusto Boal!

Research partnerships- volunteering and academia working together

Geoff Nichols, University of Sheffield and Sports Volunteering Research Network (SVRN) (workshop)

How Volunteer Organisations link with Academic Institutions to achieve Research

The workshop will describe ways in which managers and academics can work together on research. Practical examples will be provided including: student dissertations, student group projects; university funded research; contracted research and guest speakers on courses. The examples illustrate the practical details of setting this up and meeting the needs of the stakeholders: managers, students and academics. The examples will be followed by participants identifying their own research projects and ways they might be delivered. The session will include details of organisations through which academics can be contacted.

Mindfulness and Resilience

Sherie Olmstead, Managing Director, Unicorn Consulting Solutions Ltd (workshop)

Wake Up! The Surprising Truth about What Drives Stress and How We All Can Build Resilience Incorporating one of many techniques: Mindfulness

We will explore a new proven approach for dealing with stress. There is a new approach to dealing with stress and building resilience that a few wise people have known about for a long time; it’s time more people did. You will be introduced to the research of Dr. Derek Roger, one of the world’s leading researchers on stress and resilience. The goal of the session is to convince you that there is no such thing as a stressful job or stressful situation. You will learn “the key” to enduring resilience and learn to do something you probably haven’t fully done for a long time – wake up. We will explore mindfulness as a highly effective technique to helping you stay awake and defining for yourselves a stress-free life.

How to have difficult conversations

Mandy Rutter, Psychologist and Organisational Consultant (workshop)

Difficult conversations are a significant part of managing employees, volunteers and strategies. We often want to avoid such conversations for fear of conflict, but we know that our credibility and performance will be effected if we don’t take our full responsibility. However, we rarely receive training on what to say and how to manage the inevitable emotional fall-out. Whether its challenging time-keeping, safety procedures, prejudice or inappropriate behaviour, this workshop will provide practical guidance on how to manage the conversation. We will explore the psychological processes involved in conflict and offer a model of communication that helps managers to maintain flow and focus during emotionally challenging conversations.

Leadership with impact

Sherie Olmstead, Managing Director, Unicorn Consulting Solutions Ltd (workshop)

Making Leadership Happen

In our fast-changing and interconnected world, organisations feel the need for leadership more than ever. As a result, managers get a lot of advice on how to be more effective leaders. We will explore the challenges leaders face, define what effective leadership is, explore how leaders can improve and look at a targeted approach to lead with impact.

Rethinking the Data We Collect, GDPR and beyond

Tony Goodrow, CEO, Better Impact

The GDPR has forced us to look at data collection in a whole new way. And although it has caused us all a significant amount of new work in our busy lives, I think that in the end, everyone, including Leaders of Volunteers, will be better off for it. This workshop is divided into three segments. The first is taking a look at what the DGPR means in layman’s terms and seeks to demystify it.

The second segment looks a specific examples of how data collection and holding practices called for under GRPR influence overall better practices in volunteer management. These practices will have an effect on workflow efficiencies and an improvement in the volunteer experience.

The third segment is interactive look at what the workshop participants think of various pieces of data collection very common in the volunteer sector. Small groups will discuss how they think specific information should be handled in light of the first and second segments of the workshop and we’ll wrap up each example with a short full group discussion.

Networking tips for AVM events

Networking… you might love it, you may hate it, or you might fall somewhere in between these two extremes. But however you feel about it, it can be really useful for your professional development. And with conference only a week away, I wanted to share some tips on preparing to make the most of the networking time at conference. I’ve crowd sourced some of these ideas through Twitter, which I highly recommend as a great way to start networking.

Do your research

Is there someone you’ve wanted to meet for a while? There are a couple of ways you can find out who is going, ahead of conference.

Eventbrite shares first name and organisation of participants, so you can check out in advance if they are going, and look out for them on the day. 

If you’re on Twitter and not already following @AVMTweets (why not?) do so. People are already starting to chat about conference. You can always ask who is going to start a conversation. Or maybe someone you chat to regularly on Twitter is going to be there? Every year I get to meet people I’ve met on Twitter at conference.

This year’s hashtag is #AVM2018 so do include this in any tweets about the conference.

Try: Hi, I see that you work at Organisation X. I’ve been interested in – something you’re interested in learning more about. Could you tell me more about that?

Prepare

This year I’ve been working with my mentor on a number of areas of professional and personal development. One of which has been to be more effective at networking, as I am really not very comfortable with small talk. 

Part of my mentoring ‘homework’ has included preparing ahead of events like conference, or other AVM events. Things I’ve planned include something I’ve read that’s relevant to the event, or a key project I’m working on, and this has meant I’ve found I’m now less anxious before events.

I’ve also been thinking about questions to ask others at events. Is there something tricky I’m working on at the moment? I can ask someone if they’ve had to do something similar and how they handled it.
I’ve also been working on building my courage to talk to speakers at events, or someone whose work I admire. I still find it rather daunting to talk to the ‘experts’ from the stage, but I’m getting there! I just have to remind myself they’re a person like me.

Try: Hi, I see that you work at Organisation X. I’ve been interested in – something you’re interested in learning more about. Could you tell me more about that?

A simple greeting

Starting a conversation can feel really daunting, particularly if you’re not particularly comfortable with small talk. If you’re not very confident approaching people you’ve not met before, look for someone you know – or at least have met before, even if it was earlier in the event – who is talking to someone you don’t. This can often feel less daunting.

But what if you’ve come on your own and not met anyone yet? Never fear, the weather is bound to be unexpected for the season, someone’s travel to conference was probably eventful, and if all else fails, my old failsafe is “food/ coffee/ biscuits* look good/ bad/ awful*” (*delete as applicable), something I ALWAYS have an informed opinion about (don’t worry, the refreshments have always been great at conference!).

But once you’ve got past that first chat about food, and suddenly realise you’ve not actually introduced yourself, you can learn a simple networking greeting by remembering Inigo Montoya. Inigo’s most famous greeting can be broken down into four simple steps:

  1. Polite greeting: “Hello.”
  2. Name: “My name is Inigo Montoya.”
  3. Relevant personal link: “You killed my father.”
  4. Manage expectations: “Prepare to die.”

And there you have it, a simple networking greeting: “Hello. My name is Inigo Montoya. You killed my father. Prepare to die.”

And don’t worry: nobody at conference is expecting an elevator pitch from you. Where you’re from and what your role is is a great relevant personal link.

Try: Hi, I’m Jo and I’m a Volunteer Manager at Organisation X. Is this your first time at an AVM conference?

Thanks to Annabel Smith for sourcing the image.

A comfortable exit

When we’re at events we often want to meet more people, but sometimes our nerves can mean we find it hard to exit a conversation, either resulting in feeling we’ve overstayed our welcome, or rude when we leave. Don’t worry: most people won’t think you’re rude if you leave the conversation. And you don’t need to use comfort break as an uncomfortable exit excuse. A polite thank you and goodbye will be sufficient. 

Try: Steve, it was really a pleasure speaking with you. I’m going to take a look at some of the other exhibits here, but if I don’t run into you later, I hope to see you at another event soon.

Following up with contacts

Strengthening your networks is a great advantage of AVM events. If you think that you’d find it useful to follow up with someone, ask for their business card, or let them know you’ll plan to connect with them on LinkedIn.

Try: I had a great time talking with you about X and I’d love to follow up with you later? Do you have a business card, or can I connect with you on LinkedIn, as it would be great to keep in touch?

Facilitating your networking

We know striking up a conversation with someone you’ve not met before doesn’t come easy to everyone, including volunteer managers. So this year we’ve again planned ways to help facilitate your networking experience. We’ll have discussion prompts on the walls, networking tables over lunch to discuss a variety of topics, and plenty of breaks for a cuppa and a chat.

We’ve also booked a space after conference so that those who are able to stay on can have a drink, and carry on some of the great discussions that were started during the day.

Hope to see you at conference!

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